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Engineering in ancient Era

The Romans conquered not only the world, but the very nature of using for their purposes the energy of water, solar, thermal energy. The Romans had silver and it was in the water. In 1886 Spain after an explosion in the mine found the ancient giant wheel, who long ago raised the water twenty nine feet deep, driving her from one horizon to another. Inside the wheel working people, the performance is 70 liters of water per minute.

In Ancient Rome invented a water supply system. This built aqueducts. Two thousand years ago, an aqueduct in the South of France was supplied with water from a source located 25 kilometers from it. Bridge with wide spans standing on stone blocks so far. Or floods, or other disasters did not destroy it. In 1998, in Rome, archaeologists found a water mill, built in 36 year. The mill supplied flour to the entire city. It was enough to cover the aqueducts and the city remained without bread. In the forties in the South of France was found the ruins of a huge factory (2nd century ad), who used the energy of water. So the Romans came to the idea of industrialization.

The Romans knew how to throw water through the valleys, using the principle of inverted siphon. Even in the harsh environment of Northern England in the 1st century ad the Romans conquered rainwater flows and built baths for the soldiers. Each building was provided with running water. Wooden pipes, made in the hundredth year of our era till today healthy. Featuring warriors who watch, was created provided that in the 21st century has not every citizen of our country toilets with running water. However, instead of toilet paper each soldier had a sponge attached to a stick and bathed in running water.

In bath the Romans built baths near natural hot springs. In these springs the water has a constant temperature of 46 degrees Celsius for millennia. The Romans and solar energy valued: built houses the Windows to the sun using glass two thousand years ago.

The ancient Greeks were able to conquer the power of the sun 500 years earlier. There is a legend that Archimedes managed to set fire to enemy Roman ships with a solar beam, apart from the soldiers so that the rays from their polished metal shields were aimed at other ships. The scientific world laughed at this myth. But Professor Sakes, restoring the ancient Greek weapons, held a successful experience: the ships caught fire.